Classes

Classes

Lifelong Learning logo You may register for the following activities, classes, and events by contacting lifelong@lourdes.edu. Registration may be made by credit card or check. Checks should be made payable to LULL (Lourdes University Lifelong Learning) and mailed to Lourdes University Lifelong Learning, 6832 Convent Blvd. Sylvania OH 43560.

Download our Spring 2014 brochure and registration form (PDF)

Upcoming Lectures & Events

View the schedule of Lectures, the schedule of Day Trips & Special Events, or the schedule of Hot Topics

Spring 2014 Calendar

Click on a course name in the calendar below to view the course description.
Please note prices given are member/non-member, please check back for additional information

Day/Time Time Location Price
Ukrainian Easter Eggs Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19, 26, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Mother Adelaide Hall 114 $69/87
Fairy Gardens Wednesday, March 6, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $32/50
Acrylic Painting: Landscapes Mondays, March 31, April 7, 14, 21, 28, May 5, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Mother Adelaide Hall 10 $109/127
Silk Scarf Painting Tuesdays, May 6, 13, 20, 27, 1–3 p.m. Mother Adelaide Hall 10 $TBD
Fused Glass Garden Angel Stake Thursday, March 27, 9–11 a.m. Mother Adelaide Hall 10 $32/50
Glass Jewelry Friday, April 25, 10 a.m.–noon Mother Adelaide Hall 10 $32/50
Creative Cards Part 2 Mondays, March 10, 17, 24, 2–4 p.m. Regina Hall conference room $50/68
See list of tools in discription
Faust Tuesdays, April 15, 22, 29, 10 a.m. Carmel Hall 1 $42/60
The Holocaust: Literary Voices Thursdays, April 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 3–5:15 p.m. Carmel Hall 1 $81/99
Great Books
Immigrant Voices: a 21st Century Reader
Tuesdays, March 11–April 29, 1–2:30 p.m. Fireside Room of Learning Center Hall $52/70
Book: $26
Memoir Writing Mondays, March 17–April 7, 12:30–2 p.m. St. Claire Hall 142 $36/54
Discovering Your Inner Writing Room: A Shared Journey Thursdays, April 10, 24, May 1, 8, 2–4 p.m. St. Claire Hall 145 $48/66
Introduction to Genealogy Saturdays, April 5, 12, 26, May 3, 10, 17, noon–2 p.m. St. Francis Hall 1 $72/90
Advanced Genealogy Wednesdays, April 2, 9, 23, 30, May 7, 14, 1–3 p.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $72/90
Computerized Genealogy Saturdays, April 5, 12, 26, May 3, 10, 17, 10 a.m.–noon St. Francis Hall 5 $72/90
Organizing Your Genealogy on Your Computer Tuesdays, March 4–25, 9–11 a.m. Carmel Hall 1 $48/66
The Cold War, 1944–1991 Thursdays, February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27, April 10, 24, May 1, 10 a.m.–noon Franciscan Center conference room A $97/115
Book
The Fords Thursday, March 27
2–3 p.m.
Carmel Hall 1 $10/19
First Ladies of the United States: The Evolution of an "unofficial" Office Thursdays, May 8, 15, 2–3:30 p.m. St. Claire Hall 142 $18/36
Time Machine: Destination Titanic Tuesdays, April 1, 8, 15, 22, 3–4 p.m. Carmel Hall 2 $24/42
Korean War Thursdays, Feb 27, March 6, 13, 20,27, April 10, 3–5 p.m. St. Francis Hall 1 $72/90
The Underground Railroad Wednesdays, April 23, 30, May 7, 9–11 a.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $36/54
Canal Building in Northwest Ohio Wednesdays, May 14, 21, 28, 9–11 a.m. Mother Adelaide Hall 119 $36/54
Living Alongside Wolves Fridays, February 7, 14, 21, 28, 1–3 p.m. Russell Ebeid Hall 101 $48/66
Faith in our Technological Culture Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19 and 26, 9–10:15 a.m. Carmel Hall 1 $30/48
Art in America Tuesdays, April 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27, 3–5 p.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $72/90
Australia Mondays, May 5, 12, 19, 10–11:30 a.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $27/45
Jefferson's Vision: From Sections and Sailing Ships to GPS Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 2, 10:30–12:30 p.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $60/78
It's about Time Wednesday, April 9, 10:30–11:30 a.m. Appold Planetarium $10/19
An Introduction to Wine Mondays, April 7, 14, and 21, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Franciscan Center Board Room $60/78
Great Decisions Mondays, April 14, 21, 28 May 5, 12, 19, 1–3 p.m. Learning Center Hall 167 $83/101
Book: $20

Spring 2014 Classes

Art

Ukrainian Easter Eggs
Instructor: Sr. Mary Peter Kaminski
Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19, 26
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Mother Adelaide Hall 114
$69/87 non-members

Learn to make Ukrainian Easter Eggs! Sr. Mary Peter Kaminski will demonstrate traditional Pysanky designs and techniques drawn from her years of experience crafting these exquisite eggs. Students will learn to design and dye their own eggs. Cost of the class includes materials that are yours to keep. Class is limited to 8 people, so register soon!

Fairy Gardens
Instructor: Mary Marchon
Wednesday, March 6
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$32/50 non-members

Create your own Fairy garden with expert and owner of Bensell Greenhouse, Mary Marchon. Mary will not only discuss the design and plant materials used in the garden, but also how to add the magical touches such as bridges, rivers, and other fairy accessories from found objects. These gardens are perfect for indoor or outdoor settings. Unlike commercial fairy garden pieces, Bensell makes or grows everything at the greenhouse.

Acrylic Painting: Landscapes
Instructor: Anjelika Manakhimova
Mondays, March 31, April 7, 14, 21, 28, May 5
11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.
Mother Adelaide Hall 10
$109/127 non-members

Learn how to create two artworks inspired by nature, utilizing acrylic paints on canvas. Improve your skills mixing colors, learn about atmospheric perspective and landscape planes. Explore different art styles, such as Impressionism and Realism. Students are encouraged to bring their own photographs and favorite brushes. All materials and supplies are provided.

Silk Scarf Painting
Instructor: Sister Sharon Havelak, O.S.F.
Tuesdays, May 6, 13, 20, 27
1–3 p.m.
Mother Adelaide Hall 10
$TBD

Looking for that perfect scarf? How about painting it? Explore the delight of painting a silk scarf with fiber reactive dyes. You'll have the opportunity to paint at least three scarves, using different painting techniques. No previous experience necessary, just bring your creativity! All materials will be provided.

Fused Glass Garden Angel Stake
Instructor: Ann Hymel
Thursday, March 27
9–11 a.m.
Mother Adelaide Hall 10
$32/50 non-members

A garden angel watches over your growing garden and reminds us how blessed we are to have such abundance. The garden angel is 8–10" tall. There are several designs and your creation will be returned garden-ready, already mounted on an aluminum stake. The process is easy and fun. The class includes guided instructions, all the supplies and tools to create one angel.

Glass Jewelry
Instructor: Amanda Rabara
Friday, April 25
10 a.m.–noon
Mother Adelaide Hall 10
$32/50 non-members

Amanda is offering a fun new class! Each student will make 3 pieces of their choice of a ring, earrings, pendant, magnet, or pin using lots of the shimmery dichroic glass! Dichroic glass contains many micro-layers of metals, the result of which is a wide range of shifting colors. Start with the base color and build up with several pieces of dichroic glass to create sparkle and depth. You are sure to have lots of oohs and ahhs wearing your new jewelry! Make sure to sign up for this exciting jewelry making class.

Creative Cards Part 2
Instructor: Sr. Roselynn Humbert
Mondays, March 10, 17, 24
2–4 p.m.
Regina Hall conference room
$50/68 non-members
Required tools: scissors such as Cutter Bee and a small sized guillotine (bypass) paper cutter. (Fiskars has a good one.)

Create and personalize your own greeting cards as you learn wet and dry embossing and folding techniques. Various designs for cards will include gate folds, shaped cards, and other advanced techniques. Prerequisites: familiarity with basic tools used in scrapbooking and/or card making—measuring, cutting, gluing, stamping. Participants will make 3 cards at each class.

The Written Word

Faust
Instructor: Susan Shelangoskie, Ph.D.
Tuesdays, April 15, 22, 29
10 a.m.
Carmel Hall 1
$42/60 non-members
Receive a 10% discount on tickets to the performance by calling (419) 255-7464 and mentioning Lifelong Learning.

Have you ever wanted something so badly you would "sell your soul"? This familiar idea is actually rooted in the fifteenth-century German legend of Faust, an alchemist who sells his soul to the devil in return for power over the natural and supernatural world.  In this class, we will discuss two of the most pivotal renditions of this tale: Christopher Marlowe's early-modern English drama The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's influential Romantic text Faust. We will learn how the story was transformed as it was adapted for the stage and think about this literary tradition as a framework for Charles Gounod's 1859 Opera Faust in preparation for seeing a live performance by the Toledo Opera at the Valentine Theatre.  After the performance, we will have a concluding discussion of the adaptation in light of what we have learned.

The Holocaust: Literary Voices
Instructor: Marci Singer
Thursdays, April 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
3–5:15 p.m.
Carmel Hall 1
$81/99 non-members

The Holocaust is a significant event in our history, and numerous stories in multiple media portray this critical event. In this course we will read portions of an anthology that contains excerpts from memoirs, short stories, and poetry as well as reading a graphic novel and watching a film. Through this multi-faceted and comprehensive literary library, the class will reach across time and distance to engage in the detailed accounts of what life during the Holocaust entailed. By experiencing these diverse literary voices, the student can achieve a stronger grasp of the magnitude of this period in our history. The enormity of the tragic incidence of the Holocaust is of upmost importance as our country is presently facing so many conflicts on a global scale.

Great Books
Immigrant Voices: a 21st Century Reader

Instructor: Pat Bercher
Tuesdays, March 11–April 29
1–2:30 p.m.
Fireside Room of Learning Center Hall
$52/70 non-members
The required book is available for $26 payable to the instructor.

This book is a collection of short fiction that showcases some of the best contemporary writers from Southeast Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. We will interpret and enjoy conversations with this generation of newest Americans.

Memoir Writing
Instructor: Jessica Klimesh
Mondays, March 17–April 7
12:30–2 p.m.
St. Claire Hall 142
$36/54 non-members

Everybody has a unique personal story to tell: What is yours? Trying to put your life on paper can be a daunting task, but it doesn't have to be. A memoir is a narrative of personal experiences, generally bound together by a common theme, such as a hobby, a job/career, an illness, a disability, a particular characteristic, or an event. Those are just examples—you don't need to limit yourself to those ideas. Come to class with paper, a pen/pencil, and a goal: What do you want to accomplish? Who is your audience? Whether you need assistance with developing your story or whether you need an initial push of inspiration to get started altogether, and whether you're a prolific/advanced writer or whether you haven't written since your school days, this class will help to guide you in expressing your experiences and thoughts so that you can reach your goal(s) and touch your intended reader, whether that person is you or whether it's multiple readers in the form of your family, friends, or even a more public audience.

Discovering Your Inner Writing Room: A Shared Journey
Instructor: Judith Speizer Crandell
Thursdays, April 10, 24, May 1, 8
2–4 p.m.
St. Claire Hall 145
$48/66 non-members

Virginia Woolf wrote we need a room of our own to encounter our creative selves. Let's spend a series of weeks discovering our own inner writing room. Using pen and paper or laptop or iPad, we'll challenge ourselves to connect with our creativity using a visual and written journal, fashioning a poem, capturing a memory, building a short story – wherever your creative spirit leads you.

Bring a favorite quote, poem, story, picture, artifact as inspiration for the first class – and something to write with and on! Our journey will include writing exercises and group sharing as well as expanses of silence.

Genealogy

Introduction to Genealogy
Instructor: Derek S. Davey
Saturdays, April 5, 12, 26, May 3, 10, 17
noon–2 p.m.
St. Francis Hall 1
$72/90 non-members

Do you know who you are? Are you interested in your family history? Learn about genealogical principles and ethics, research tools, records, and how to use them. Students will learn how to research, organize, and evaluate their findings. Also included will be newspaper sources as well as vital, court, church, immigration, military, cemetery, burial, probate and land records. The Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) will also be discussed.

Advanced Genealogy
Instructor: Derek S. Davey
Wednesdays, April 2, 9, 23, 30, May 7, 14
1–3 p.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$72/90 non-members

Have you started your genealogy and gotten the basics down? Please join us as we work on skills that help us in breaking down those brick walls. The Advanced Genealogy course will take those basics and expand on them. Learn skills the professionals use to solve genealogy challenges.

Computerized Genealogy
Instructor: Derek S. Davey
Saturdays, April 5, 12, 26, May 3, 10, 17
10 a.m.–noon
St. Francis Hall 5
$72/90 non-members

With the development of the Internet, the ability to research your Genealogy has become so much easier. You still have to know how to use and be aware of the many changes in websites. Please join us for six weeks of Genealogy Computer Class to learn the ins and outs of using the Internet to complete your Genealogy. We will be holding this class in the Computer Lab. Computers will be provided, but you can also bring your own laptop. Please join us for this exciting opportunity to learn what to do and not do when using the Internet to complete our family research journey.

Organizing Your Genealogy on Your Computer
Instructor: Pat McNichols
Tuesdays, March 4–25
9–11 a.m.
Carmel Hall 1
$48/66 non-members

Do you have family history information you have found on the internet but you have just kept the paper copies because you don't know how to organize it on your computer? This class will show you how to use common computer software and the features of your computer to organize your information and create useful documents. Topics will include creating folders on your computer for storing pictures, records and other documents; understanding common types of computer files and what you can do with them; using word processing software to create biographies and stories about your ancestors—complete with photos; using a spreadsheet to create time lines and other lists; understanding what genealogy software can do; and backing up and saving your work. Bring a laptop if you have one and apply what you learn to your own family history.

History

The Cold War, 1944–1991
Instructor: Don K. Rowney, Ph.D.
Thursdays, February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27, April 10, 24, May 1
10 a.m.–noon
Franciscan Center conference room A
$97/115 non-members
Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1949, revised 3rd edition, by Martin McCauley will be available for purchase at the University bookstore and on reserve in the Lourdes Library.

This course focuses on the historical era of confrontation between the USA and USSR which emerged from the end of World War II and endured for more than forty years. This era is usually referred to as the "Cold War". Following the prominent political, economic and social details of the period, the course will discuss such matters as the origins of the Cold War, the motivations which lay beneath the originating events, the personalities who were the motivators throughout Cold War history, and the economics and technologies that sustained competition during the War. The course will identify and describe the major events which made the Cold War a threat to the survival of humanity and it will discuss the reasons why these events and other, less threatening, episodes, were gradually resolved during the 1970s and 1980s.

This course will rely upon classroom lectures, assigned readings and documentary films. One component of the readings will be Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1949, revised 3rd edition, by Martin McCauley. This short book will be available for purchase at the University bookstore and on reserve in the Lourdes Library.

The Fords
Instructor: Regan Brock, Ph.D.
Thursday, March 27
2–3 p.m.
Carmel Hall 1
$10/19 non-members

Gerald and Betty Ford exemplified Midwestern values and honest forthrightness. Although his time as President was short, their impact was real, especially hers. In preparation for the Lifelong Learning trip to the Gerald Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Dr. Regan Brock will discuss their individual careers and their contributions as First Couple.

First Ladies of the United States: The Evolution of an "unofficial" Office
Instructor: Regan Brock Ph.D.
Thursdays, May 8, 15
2–3:30 p.m.
St. Claire Hall 142
$18/36 non-members

This class will explore the development of the role of First Lady in the United States, with emphasis upon the ever-changing power of women in political life and upon the controversies and contributions of Ohio's eight First Ladies. How has the role changed over time? Why do we remain so ambivalent regarding our expectations? When the time comes, what will we expect of the first First Gentleman?

Time Machine: Destination Titanic
Instructor: Ruthi Mitchell
Tuesdays, April 1, 8, 15, 22
3–4 p.m.
Carmel Hall 2
$24/42 non-members

It's April, 1912, and you are boarding the newest luxury liner on the ocean, the pride and joy of the White Star Line, the "unsinkable" Titanic! Come with us on a four- week adventure as we investigate the most famous shipwreck in history from the perspective of the passengers. As you enter, you will be given a boarding pass that identifies you as a real Titanic passenger. We will explore the ship, meet other passengers, learn about the sinking (on the actual aniversary date) and discuss the aftermath copies of the actual trial transcripts. You will have an opportunity to research your passenger and discover "your" fate. I promise that you will return safely to Lourdes Harbor after four weeks of study with a new appreciation for the grace and beauty of this magnificent ship and the tragic loss of life that sent her spiraling into infamy.

Korean War
Instructor Dwyane Beggs, Ph.D.
Thursdays, Feb 27, March 6, 13, 20,27, April 10
3–5 p.m.
St. Francis Hall 1
$72/90 non-members

At the conclusion of World War II Korea was divided at the 38th parallel. North Korea was controlled by Communist forces led by Kim Il Sung and the South was controlled by Syngman Rhee-who was supported by the United States. The Korean War (1950-1953) began when the North Korean Communist army crossed the 38th Parallel and invaded non-Communist South Korea. As Kim Il-sung's North Korean army quickly overran South Korea, the United States came to South Korea's aid. Joins us as we give consideration to why the North Koreans 11 attacked South Korea, the role played by the Soviet Union prior to and during the Korean War, and finally the response of the U.S. to the North Korean attack on South Korea.

The Underground Railroad
Instructor: Greg Miller
Wednesdays, April 23, 30, May 7
9–11 a.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$36/54 non-members

Come explore the history of the Underground Railroad in Toledo and Northwest Ohio! This class will include a field trip to Sylvania's own Lathrop House, a possible stop on the route. All materials will be supplied by the instructor.

Canal Era in Northwest Ohio
Instructor: Greg Miller
Wednesdays, May 14, 21, 28
9–11 a.m.
Mother Adelaide Hall 119
$36/54 non-members

This class will explore the history of canals and canal building in Northwest Ohio, with special focus on the Miami and Erie Canals. This class will include a field trip to Providence Metropark to experience what travel was like on a canal, and (time permitting) a stop at St. Patrick's Cemetery, the final resting place of a number of canal workers.

Living Alongside Wolves
Instructors: Adam Hodge, Ph.D. and Jim Minesky, Ph.D.
Fridays, February 7, 14, 21 and 28
1–3 p.m.
Russell Ebeid Hall 101
$48/66
The textbook required for this class, Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat is available at the Lourdes bookstore, $7 to rent or $13 to purchase.

Human societies and wolves have had long and fabled histories and interactions. This course will explore the complex relationships between wolves and people in North America by focusing on myths and misunderstandings in historical times, key aspects of wolf ecology, the political history of humans and wolves, and changes in government policies about wolf management and conservation. Through the integration of history and ecology we can discuss what the future might hold for wolves and people.

New and Different

Faith in our Technological Culture
Instructor: Margaret Bretzloff
Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19 and 26
9–10:15 a.m.
Carmel Hall 1
$30/48 non-members

The class will consider how technology has impacted our culture. How it has changed our relationships with our environment and each other. How should our faith traditions respond to this culture of technology? Does technology promote justice or lead to ever greater inequities? How should religious institutions themselves use technology, especially communications technology? The format for the class will be lecture and discussion.

Art in America
Instructor: Kristin Baldeschwiler
Tuesdays, April 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27
3–5 p.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$ 72/90 non-members

Have you ever heard of the Ashcan School? How about the Hudson River School? Learn about these schools of painting, as well as the other major figures and works in American art history. This course will provide an introduction to the art and architecture of the United States from colonial times through the early 21st Century.

Australia
Instructor: Christine Knaggs, Ph.D.
Mondays, May 5, 12, 19
10–11:30 a.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$27/45 non-members

Explore the land down under with Lourdes Professor Christine Knaggs. Through a Rotary sponsored cultural exchange in March, Christine will be exploring Melbourne and Eastern Victoria, Australia. Classes will focus on the biological diversity found in southern Australia, the modern educational system, and Australian culture, both modern and Aboriginal.

Jefferson's Vision: From Sections and Sailing Ships to GPS
Instructor: George Shirk
Wednesdays, March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 2
10:30–12:30 a.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$60/78 non-members

Sending a man to the moon pales in comparison to Thomas Jefferson's Vision. He saw a landscape filled with farms, mountains that were mapped, safe harbors for ships, all tied together by a single system. His vision enabled canals, rail lines and interstate highways to be built. In our time, his vision allowed for the GPS system to function. To understand these statements, we will explore the process of measuring America, following the footsteps of those who marked the first lines, identified the safe harbors for sailing ships, and measured the mountains. We will begin with metes and bounds and navigating the ocean. We will look at the process for measuring the distance from Maryland to New Orleans, examine the Public Land Survey system, and explore questions such as why the Army Corps of Engineers is in charge of the rivers and streams and took the blame for the flooding of New Orleans. Finally, why it was necessary to develop time zones?

It's about Time
Instructor: Laura Megeath
Wednesday, April 9
10:30–11:30 a.m.
Appold Planetarium
$10/19 non-members

Our concept of time is intimately linked to the sun and astronomy. Journey into space for a lesson on time and time keeping. Afterwards, continue the conversation in the Lourdes Café over lunch.

An Introduction to Wine
Instructor: Jim Krusinski
Mondays, April 7, 14, and 21
6:30–8:30 p.m.
Franciscan Center Board Room
$60/78 non-members
Must be 21 years or older

Americans are drinking more wine than ever before. In response to the demand, the number of wines available for sale has increased to the point that a buying decision is more difficult than ever. The goal of this course, aimed at the novice wine drinker, is to arm the participants with the essential information to make a more informed choice when purchasing at a restaurant or store. Topics will include how to read a wine label, how to taste, how to identify the differences between imported wine versus domestic, smart buying and much, much more. Tastings of 6 different wines as each meeting are included in the price of the course.

Great Decisions
Instructor: Dean Purdy
Mondays, April 14, 21, 28 May 5, 12, 19
1–3 p.m.
Learning Center Hall 167
$83/101 non-members
The textbook required for this class, Great Decisions, is available at the Lourdes bookstore for $20.

Each year the Foreign Policy Association chooses eight topics of international importance, and details them in a Briefing Book. Together with a film series, this is the basis for our nation's largest discussion program on international affairs and U.S. foreign policy with tens of thousands of Americans participating annually. 2014 topics include: Turkey's challenges, Israel and the U.S., Islamic awakening, energy independence, food & climate, China's foreign policy, and U.S. trade policy. Anyone with an interest in today's fast-changing world will enjoy this course.

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