Biology & Health:
Course Outlines

Biology and Health

Biology and Health: Course Outlines

The outlines listed on this page are general descriptions of courses offered by Lourdes. For specific information regarding this semester's courses, including textbooks and schedules, please consult the Course Syllabi page. All outlines are provided in PDF format.

BIO 197: Biodiversity & Conservation
Introduces students to biodiversity - the diversity of life on Earth - and the importance of that diversity to both humans and the natural world. Examines the biological characteristics and ecological roles of the major group of organisms. This course does not meet any requirements for a biology major, biology minor, or environmental science major. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

BIO 201: Principles of Biology
Introduces fundamental biological processes and problems as they apply to cellular and molecular biology and ecological systems. Considers the cell, chemical processes, bioenergetics, genetics, and ecological principles and processes. Must be taken by all students who are required to take at least one semester of biology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

BIL 201: Principles of Biology I Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 201 Principles of Biology I lecture. Requires additional group and individual study and meetings with instructor.

BIO 202: Principles of Biology II
Introduces fundamental biological principles and problems as they apply to organismic, ecological and evolutionary levels of plant and animals worlds. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: BIO 201.

BIL 202: Principles of Biology II Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 202 Principles of Biology II lecture. Requires additional group and individual study and meetings with instructor. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIL 201.

BIO 204: Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology
Presents a fundamental knowledge of basic physiology of the human body. Includes demonstrations and practical applications to support lecture topics. Designed for students in non-science concentrations. Credit is not applicable to a science concentration or biology minor.

BIO 212: Nutrition
Presents a broad-based approach to the study of nutrition for the non-science major. Includes current controversies, fundamental scientific principles of foods, water, vitamins, minerals, along with discussion of the special needs of varying age groups. Credit not applicable to a science concentration.

BIO 215: Basic Ecology
Studies the fundamental biological and physical processes, which influence biomes, ecosystems, and populations of organisms. Includes consideration of natural resources, stewardship and conservation, as well as discussion of sustainable development. Credit not applicable to a science concentration or major.

BIO 216: Seasonal Field Ecology
Presents a hands-on course, which exposes students to many interrelationships between plants and animals of the natural environment. Teaches students to identify plants and animals of the Great Lakes bioregion. Includes discussion of communities, habitats, biomes, succession, and energy utilization in food chains and food webs. Uses the Lourdes campus and several field trips to off-campus sites. Three hours lecture and arranged field activities.

BIO 308: Genetics
Examines the principles of transmission genetics and delves into the cellular and molecular aspects of genetic mechanisms in organisms. Considers chromosome behavior, gene structure and function, protein synthesis mechanisms and interactions as well as processes of recombinant DNA technique. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites: ENG 101, ENG 102, or their equivalent, BIO 201. CHM 121 and CHM 122 or CHM 181 as prerequisite or co-requisite.

BIL 308: Genetics Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 308 Genetics lecture. Requires additional individual and group study and meetings with instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 102 or their equivalent, BIO 201 and BIL 201, CHM 121 and CHM 122 or CHM 181 as prerequisite or corequisite

BIO 311: Invertebrate Zoo
Surveys the major invertebrate phyla, emphasizing the principles of morphology, development, physiology, evolutionary relationships and environmental interactions. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites: BIO 201 or permission of the instructor, ENG 101, ENG 102, or their equivalent. CHM 121 and CHM 122 or CHM 181 as prerequisite or co-requisite.

BIL 311: Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 311 Invertebrate Zoology. Requires additional time for individual and group study and meetings with instructor. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIL 201 or permission of the instructor, ENG 101, ENG 102 or their equivalent. CHM 121 and CHM 122 or CHM 181 as prerequisite or corequisite

BIO 330: Anatomy and Physiology I
Studies the chemical basis of life, body organization, cellular structure and metabolism, tissues, membranes, and glands. Includes lab experiences designed to supplement lecture topics: cell physiology, tissues, human bones, dissection of a cat or cadaver, certain physiological experiments and computer simulations. Three hours lecture, two and one-half hours lab. Prerequisites: BIO 201 with a minimum grade of C, or high school biology taken within the last 5 years with a minimum grade of B, or a minimum of 80% on a basic biology concepts pre-test, CHM 099 or its equivalent.

BIL 330 Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 330 Anatomy and Physiology I lecture. Requires additional group and individual study and meetings with instructor. Labs are two and one-half hours long. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIL 201 with a minimum grade of C, or high school biology taken within the last 5 years with a minimum grade of C, or a minimum of 80% on a basic biology concepts pre-test; CHM 099 or its equivalent

BIO 331: Anatomy and Physiology II
Studies the structure and function of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems and human development. Lab emphasizes anatomy and includes certain physiological experiments, computer simulations, and cat or cadaver dissection. Three hours lecture, two and one-half hours lab. Prerequisite: BIO 330 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

BIL 331: Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Laboratory accompanies BIO 331 Anatomy and Physiology II lecture. Requires additional individual and group study and meetings with instructor. Prerequisites: BIO 330 and BIL 330 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

BIO 335: General Microbiology
Includes a general study of the morphology, taxonomy, metabolism growth, genetics, control and ecology of microbes with emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Considers the evolution of microbes in the macrocosm of planet Earth and the evolving epidemiology and immunology concepts in their interaction with diverse life forms. Prerequisites: High School biology, BIO 201 or equivalent. CHM 121 and CHM 122 or equivalent as prerequisite or co-requisite, or permission of the instructor. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

BIL 335: General Microbiology Laboratory
Laboratory accompanies BIO 335 General Microbiology lecture. Requires an additional one to two hours of lab time per week for various procedures: staining, observation, data collection, consulting, depending on the requirements of particular lab protocol. Prerequisites: High school biology, BIO 201 and BIL 201 or equivalent and CHM 121 and 122 or equivalent as prerequisite or corequisite, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 340: Pathophysiology
Presents applications of the pathologic variations from the normal function and structure of the body resulting from disease, heredity or injury. It provides a link between anatomy and physiology and biochemistry and its application to clinical practice. Prerequisites: BIO 330 and BIO 331 or equivalent; BIO 335 or equivalent as prerequisite or co-requisite.

BIO 402: Introduction to Research
Introduces scientific literature research methods. Emphasis will be placed on doing literature searches using scientific abstracts, indexes and computer on-line databases. Procedures for writing a scientific paper using either CBE or APA or ACS guidelines will be covered. Prerequisite: admission to the major or BA-IS natural science candidate.

BIO 408: Behavior & Behavioral Ecology
Presents the fundamental concepts, principles, and theories. of animal behavior and behavioral ecology. Emphasis is placed on understanding the evolution of behaviors, the ecological basis and outcomes of specific behaviors, and how scientists study the evolution and ecology of behavior. Explores the relevance of behavioral ecology to conservation of populations, species, and biodiversity. Four hours lecture, optional three hours BIL 408 Behavior & Behavioral lab. Prerequisites: ENG 102 or its equivalent; BIO 317 or at least nine hours of PSY or SOC or their equivalent with a grad of “C” or higher or permission of the instructor.

BIO 410: Biology Seminar
Gives students experience in preparing and presenting a scientific paper. Taken by students having senior status who are seeking a concentration in biology as a requirement for graduation. Initial project must be approved by the Department Chairperson two semesters before graduation. Biology and Environmental Science majors must take this course for 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: BIO 402.

BIO 440: Conservation Biology
Presents the scientific basis for and the actual practice of conserving biological diversity. Examines the ecological concepts and principles, as well as key social, economic, policy, and cultural factors, necessary to understand the threats to and conservation of the diversity of life and ecosystems. Provides a framework for understanding the interdisciplinary nature of real efforts to conserve biological diversity. Four hours lecture/discussion. Prerequisites: ENG 102 or its equivalent; BIO 317 or its equivalent; at least Junior status; or permission of Instructor.

ENV 202: Society, Environment & Sustainability
Introduction to the key schools of thought, worldviews, concepts, and innovations that have influenced human interactions with the environment. Covers the importance of considering economic, social, technological, scientific, and policy facets of complex problems related to the environment and sustainability. Emphasis is on developing an interdisciplinary and holistic understanding of the causes and consequences of and potential solutions to problems. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or its equivalent; ENV 201 or BIO 202 as prerequisite or co-requisite or its equivalent; a declared major in the environment program or permission of Instructor.

ENV 433: Ecological Restoration
Enables students to examine specific methods of ecological restoration and the application of those methods to actual restoration projects, while being of service. Requires a student to work on, individually or as a team member, at least one aspect of an actual ecological restoration project (such as design, field implementation, community outreach or education, volunteer coordination, or post-project monitoring). Also requires the student to hold meetings with the Instructor to discuss the student’s work and progress and to write a formal report summarizing the project and the student’s role and work. Can be repeated for up to a total of 6 semester hours with permission of two environmental faculty. Prerequisites: At least Junior status; ENV 432 and ENL 432; and permission of two environmental faculty.

HTW 254: Health Science for Teachers of Young Adolescent to Young Adults
Designed to acquaint students with basic information, history, philosophy and competencies unique to health education in the school setting. This course will help education majors apply the information they learn in a health content course to grades 4-12 teaching experience. Areas covered include conflict management, mental health and stress, drug use and abuse, sexuality, relationships, nutrition, fitness, infectious diseases, environmental health, and death and dying. This course is designed to address concerns of the student, as well as the future teacher. Prerequisites: EDU 100 and prerequisite or co-requisite of EDM, EDE, or EDA 250.

HTW 333: Alternative/Complementary Health Practices
Explores, compares, and evaluates alternative approaches and philosophies to personal health management. . Topics include, but are not limited to Homeopathy, T'ai Chi and Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Yoga, Crystal and Electromagnetic Therapy, Guided Imagery and Hypnotherapy Prerequisite: ENG 102 or equivalent.

HTW 410: Death, Dying and Bereavement
Explores socio-cultural attitudes and behaviors surrounding death, dying and bereavement. Examines current ethical issues and research on death and dying and professional interventions to support dying persons and their families utilizing ethical principles. Considers the grief process and problems peculiar to family members and other survivors.

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