Planetarium

On Monday afternoon, August 21, millions of people across the United States will see nature’s wondrous spectacle — an eclipse of the Sun! A total eclipse is a scene of unimaginable beauty; the Moon completely blocks the Sun, daytime becomes a deep twilight, and the Sun’s corona shimmers in the darkened sky.

Begins: Monday, August 21, 2017 at 1:02 pm

Maximum: Monday, August 21, 2017 at 2:27 pm

Ends: Monday, August 21, 2017 at 3:48 pm

Duration: 2 hours, 46 minutes

The total eclipse will not be visible from northwest Ohio, but we will see 80-90% coverage of the Sun. The Appold Planetarium has resources to help you make the most of this spectacular teaching opportunity.

  • Planetarium shows to explain the science behind solar and lunar eclipses, with age-appropriate explanations and simulations. $3 per student, $4 per adult, with one free adult admission for every ten students. Our weather is always perfect!
  • Eclipse glasses to view the sun safely, $1 per pair.

    Eclipse Shades

ECLIPSE LINKS

The total solar eclipse is on August 21, 2017. This will be visible in the continental United States for the first time in almost 40 years.

  • Our favorite maps and animations, plus travel advice for people willing to travel to see the eclipse.
  • This simulator from NASA lets you watch the eclipse from any location.
  • Videos, short and clear, that explain why eclipses are rare, how to view an eclipse safely, and more.
  • An elementary school teacher put together this lesson plan for teaching about the upcoming eclipse.
  • Try these 2 easy activities to explain why eclipses happen!
  • This is the place to read about everything from phases of the moon to past & future eclipses!
  • If you want to read just one document, download this PDF.

Recommended Links

  • Exploratorium: discover your weight and age on other planets!
  • Google Sky: browse the universe, locate planets and constellations in the sky, zoom in to distant galaxies and nebulae.
  • Hands-On Solar Activities: the YPOP Solar Classroom is filled with hands-on, solar related activities.

NASA Links

  • NASA Climate Kids demystifies the “Big Questions” about global climate change using 4-6th-grade-level language, colorful illustrations, humor, interactivity, and games.
  • SciJinks Weather Laboratory targets middle-schoolers. It explains the reasons for the seasons, the tides, and other weather and Earth science mysteries in colorful “Now I get it!” pages.
  • SunTrek: take a journey into space and find out more about the Sun and its effect on the Earth.
  • The Evening Sky Map & Calendar: a two-page guide to the night sky.
  • Toledo Astronomical Association: offers star parties (open to the public) and telescope advice.