LifelongLearningProgram

You may register for the following activities, classes, and events by contacting 419-824-3707 or email lifelong@lourdes.edu.

Registration may be made by credit card or check. Checks should be made payable to LULL (Lourdes University Lifelong Learning) and mailed to: Lourdes University Lifelong Learning, 6832 Convent Blvd. Sylvania OH 43560.

Lifelong Learning SPRING 2020 Registration Form

Puccini’s La Boheme: an Introduction

Dr. Christopher Williams

3:30 – 5:00 pm, Tuesday

February 4

Cost: $22 members; $34 non-members

Prior to the performance by the Toledo Opera, enjoy a multi-layered introduction to Puccini’s evergreen tragedy La Boheme. The work’s genesis and reception, it’s place in Puccini’s career and in the history of Italian opera will all be discussed.

Dr. Christopher Williams holds a PhD in Music History and Literature from the University of California at Berkeley, and has taught at the University of Toledo, Bowling Green State University, the Universität Salzburg, and in the joint program of the Cleveland Institute of Music and Case Western Reserve University. He is considered an expert on the music of Fin-de-siècle Vienna.

Spanish Conversation

Raquel Bravo

10:00 – 11:30 am, Mondays & Wednesdays (meets twice per week)

Session 1: Feb. 10 – March 18, omitting Feb. 17

Session 2: April 20 – May 20

Cost per session: $58 members; $70 non-members

Come speak Spanish with us! Whether you’re planning a trip abroad or learning for fun, this is a comfortable and supportive way to learn. Class time will focus on this beautiful Latin language with useful vocabulary and scenario dialogues, as well as a little of its culture and history. Students are invited to practice Spanish during lunch at the Lourdes Café after class (price of lunch not included).

Raquel Bravo is a native Spanish speaker who has taught English/Spanish bilingual education and adult education. She is a retired school administrator who has enjoyed traveling to Spain, Mexico and South America extensively. She is eager to share her love of the Spanish language with you!

Crocheting: Stitching Together

Mary Jo Blohm

10:00 – noon, Tuesdays

Feb. 11, 18, March 3, 10 (4 weeks)

Cost: $59 members; $71 non-members

Location: Fireside Room, St. Agnes Hall

Work on your crocheting with us! If you know basic crochet stitches then this class is for you. Bring your project, yarn and hooks. We will review some stitches and help with pattern reading. Class size is limited to allow for individual attention.

Mary Jo Blohm is retired and enjoys traveling, reading and crafting. She was introduced to crocheting at an early age and has taught herself to follow various patterns and create individualized projects. Some of her crocheted items are sold at All Good Things.

Religion & Spirituality

Gloria Denos

2:00 – 3:30 pm, Mondays

February 17 – March 9 (4 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

The terms religion and spirituality are often used interchangeably, and this often leads to debates and arguments. According to Webster’s Dictionary, religion is defined as “the belief in a god or in a group of gods; an organized system of beliefs, ceremonies, and rules used to worship a god or a group of gods; an interest, a belief, or an activity that is very important to a person or group.” According to the allaboutspirituality.com website, “Spirituality extends beyond an expression of religion or practice of religion. There is a pursuit for a spiritual dimension that not only inspires, but creates harmony with the universe.”

One can see that religion and spirituality are two very different perspectives. A person can follow a religion, and not be spiritual, while a spiritual individual may not follow any particular religious path at all! This enrichment course will explore the difference between the two, and discover how people might embrace and practice a religion, while also becoming a more spiritual person. We will look at ways to deepen your spirituality and explore the varied ways people pursue and develop their personal spirituality. Gloria Denos is an instructor of Theological Studies at Lourdes University.

Great Decisions – 2020

Hugh Grefe

1:30 – 3:30 pm, Tuesdays

February 18 – April 7 (8 weeks)

Cost: $91 members; $103 non-members

Do you want to know the story behind the biggest stories in global news? Join America’s largest discussion program on world affairs. Each year the Foreign Policy Association selects eight critical issues. The Great Decisions topics for 2020 include such diverse topics as climate change and the global order, modern slavery and human trafficking, the Philippines and the U.S., and artificial intelligence and data.

We read a chapter in the briefing book at home, then watch a televised segment at the start of class before diving into a spirited discussion guided by thoughtful discussion questions. The textbook required for this class, Great Decisions, is published by the Foreign Policy Association and is available for purchase on the Lourdes campus at All Good Things gift shop for $32.

Facilitator Hugh Grefe earned a Master of Arts in History at the University of Toledo and has served in a variety of senior staff and board roles in the greater Toledo community. In 2002 he was awarded a Fannie Mae Foundation Fellowship for the Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

The Will of the People: Readings in American Democracy, Part 2

Hugh Grefe

1:30 – 3:30 pm, Thursdays

February 27 – March 26, omitting 3/19 (4 weeks)

Cost: $58 members; $70 non-members

Our democracy rises out of the ideas enshrined in documents nearly 250 years old. Yet throughout our national history Americans have debated, advocated, and struggled as they sought to apply the foundational ideas to their times. In the fall, this class read documents ranging from the Declaration of Independence to George Washington’s Farewell Address. Now we will examine key documents from the Civil War and the fight for civil rights; we will read and discuss everything from the Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, to the case of the US vs. Susan B. Anthony, to Dr. Martin Luther King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail, as well as other stirring writings.

The book for this course, The Will of the People: Readings in American Democracy, brings together 14 monumental texts and invites discussion of their meaning and continuing significance. Published by the Great Books Foundation, The Will of the People will be available for purchase on the Lourdes campus at All Good Things gift shop for $13.

Thinking Outside the Box “Enhanced”

Barbara Mauter

10:00 – noon, Friday

February 28

Cost: $26 members; $36 non-members

Match your critical thinking skills with other teams for a challenge! This Thinking Outside the Box “Enhanced” class has a new twist: teams of two will take part in a friendly critical thinking competition to solve challenging and thought-provoking puzzles. Sign up as a team, or take a chance, and be paired with a random participant. Teams will compete solving critical thinking challenges. Course will feature metacognitive (“thinking about thinking”) and lateral thinking activities. A prodigious way to exercise your brain!

Barbara Mauter is an adjunct instructor with over 20 years’ experience teaching college. She has taught and presented various workshops for UT, BGSU, Monroe County Community College and Owens State Community College. Her interests center around thinking, reading and how our minds work. She is known for her critical thinking class activities.

Drawing What You See

Patrick Dubreuil

10:00 am – 12:30 pm, Mondays

March 2 – April 6 (6 weeks)

Cost: $110 members; $122 non-members

This drawing experience is for the artist who would like to better draw what they see. We will touch upon the basics of line, shape and perspective, but the focus of this class will be on measuring. Attention to objects’ relationships to one another visually through measuring will make your drawing reflect that visual. To add a bit more fun and challenge, we will do a couple of exercises where we draw from the mind.

A Toledo native, Patrick Dubreuil has taught in the Lourdes Art Department for 13 years since getting his M.F.A. from BGSU.

Creative Conversation

Max Kohr

10:00 – 11:30 am, Tuesdays

March 3 – 17 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 members; $44 non-members

Fun is an essential part of this course as we learn more about table talk, introductions, storytelling and telling a joke. You will find this class to be entertaining as well as educational. Whether you only want to speak to a small group of friends or a larger audience, this course is sure to give you tips on how to get your points across. Learn new speaking skills at this “how to” workshop. Find how you can start a conversation and keep it going. Overcome your fear in a comfortable and supportive environment as we strive to become more effective communicators.

Max Kohr is a seasoned speaker, workshop presenter and Distinguished Toastmaster. His motto is: “Don’t let the truth get in the way of a good story.”

The Business of Wine

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Tuesday,

March 3

Cost: $25 members; $37 non-members

Taste 6 wines while we examine the business of wine, including the market, influences, threats, technology changes, and much more! If you worry about potential tariffs on French wines or whether screw cap wines are better than box wines, this class is for you. Students are invited to bring their questions along with their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Nicholas Kubiak is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Spirits and a veteran of our local wine industry.

Memories: the Rewards of Looking Backward

Patricia Schnapp, RSM, PhD

10:00 – noon, Fridays

March 6 – 13 (2 weeks)

Cost: $29 members; $41 non-members

Memories are sacred. Reflecting on them and sharing them should not be dismissed as obsessions of old age. The loss of memory is tragic, as we recognize in those with dementia and Alzheimer’s. We are sometimes told not to live in the past: “What’s done is done and we can’t change it.” True, but we can enrich our lives and increase our happiness –and self-understanding– by spending time with our memories. Reviving memories is powerful, and it’s good to ask what a particular memory does for us–stir up anger and shame, or pride, love, and gratitude? Or laughs! These sessions will draw in part on Macrina Wiederkehr’s fine book Gold in your Memories. You’re invited to an exhilarating goldrush!

Patricia Schnapp, PhD, is a retired professor of English, a poet, and a Sister of Mercy. Currently, she volunteers in prisons as a teacher and chaplain and at a homeless shelter. She continues to write.

Planning Ahead: Housing

Chris Cremean

1:00 – 2:00 pm, Friday

March 6

Cost: $17 members; $29 non-members

Transitions can be tough for everyone, particularly when unexpected changes occur. A range of services are offered at various types of housing options, from independent living to care facilities. Navigating the options requires planning and research, and this class will clarify how each setting could work for you and how to decide when to consider each option.

Chris Cremean is a Resource Specialist with the Caregiver Resources Group, LLC and is affiliated with the Area Office on Aging, Northwest Ohio.

Roaring through the Twenties: American History Experienced through Poetry

Shari O’Brien, Ph.D., J.D.

1:30 – 3:45 pm, Tuesdays

March 10 – 31 (4 weeks)

Cost: $65 members; $77 non-members

Those who love history or poetry or both will be dazzled by this centennial celebration of the dramatic 1920’s. Picking up the pieces of American lives shattered by the cataclysm of WWI, we will begin by discovering the Lost Generation and end with a discussion of the stock market crash of 1929. In between will find us exploring, among other things, the Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age, and what the French termed the “annees foiles” (crazy years) of flappers, bootleggers, the advent of the Golden Age of radio and the movies, and the lives of ordinary people who would become the Greatest Generation. Throughout, we will pair the works of poets like Frost, Sandburg, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Langston Hughes to events of the era, breathing life into history and culture.

Dr. O’Brien has doctorates in English and law; she worked in United States District Court. Publishing five law review articles as well as hundreds of essays and poems in national journals, she taught writing and poetry for twenty-seven years at UT and continues to practice law and write poetry today.

Through the Windshield: the American Built Environment

Dr. Steve Bare

1:00 – 2:00 pm, Thursday

March 12

Cost: $17 members; $29 non-members

Perhaps Chuck Berry was on to something when he wrote “No Particular Place to Go.” By the song’s release in 1964, Americans were fully invested in the automobile and its culture. However, what impact did the automobile have on the architecture of the American built environment? This course examines the myriad ways the automobile, and its culture, impacted the way Americans constructed their environment from the inception of the vehicle to the present. We explore the processes of suburbanization, fast food establishments, motels/hotels, automobile centric entertainment, and the shopping mall. We will wrap up by critiquing whether these structures are worthy of preservation as historic emblems. So, get in, buckle your seat belt, and let’s go for a ride!

Dr. Steve Bare is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Department of History at the University of Toledo. Dr. Bare’s research and teaching specializations focus on how Americans craft historical memory of conflicts from the Civil War through WWII. He has Masters degrees in both applied history and education, as well as a doctorate in history.

Planning Ahead: Financial & Legal Issues

Chris Cremean

1:00 – 2:00 pm, Friday

March 13

Cost: $17 members; $29 non-members

Everyone’s situation is unique, but this class will help you to structure your financial and legal documents to best fit your needs. Learn how your financial situation determines what services are available to you and the eligibility requirements for Medicare, Medicaid, and veterans’ benefits. Understand how advanced directives ensure that decisions can be made for you that are in your best interests. Avoid overwhelming emergency troubles by planning ahead.

The “Unknown” Tchaikovsky

Dr. Christopher Williams

3:30 – 5:00 pm, Mondays

March 16 – 30

Cost: $32 members; $44 non-members

Since Tchaikovsky routinely ranks among the most popular of all classical composers, it might be surprising to suggest that there is something important about his musical legacy that still counts as “unknown.” But Tchaikovsky’s fame and reputation with American audiences rests primarily with a handful of works that are so frequently and regularly performed as to have become part of our daily musical wallpaper: the 1812 Overture, Romeo and Juliet, the Nutcracker, and possibly Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, and the last three symphonies. But, as with many composers, focusing on just the most famous works obscures their true legacy. Tchaikovsky was the first fully professionally trained composer that Russia produced, and he excelled in every genre available to composers of his era.

This class will highlight three key works, along with some other compositions that deserve attention. The first class will focus on his opera Eugene Onegin; the second class will focus on the Manfred symphony and other lesser-known orchestral works; the third class will focus on his opera The Queen of Spades, a work he came to regard as his masterpiece. These are not truly obscure works, having benefited from many recordings and live performances, including in America. But they are less familiar to the casual listener and cast Tchaikovsky as one of the most profound and thoughtful composers of the nineteenth century.

What’s in a Name?

Dale Lanigan

2:00 – 3:30 pm, Wednesdays

March 18 – April 8 (4 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

Labeling someone a socialist happens frequently, but what does the term really mean? At the same time that Socialism has become a much discussed topic in American politics, polls indicate that views on socialism are quite divergent and Americans vary greatly in their understanding of what it is. This class will examine the core characteristics of socialism and compare it with other “isms” including, but not limited to, Capitalism and Communism.

Dale Lanigan is Assistant Professor of Sociology & Justice Studies at Lourdes University.

Planning Ahead: Medical Care & Benefits

Chris Cremean

1:00 – 2:00 pm, Friday

March 20

Cost: $17 members; $29 non-members

As medical needs arise, the course of action to address those needs are largely determined by your medical team, health insurance coverage, and in which setting the care can be delivered. This class will help you to better understand your benefits and options, including skilled/intermediate/home care, Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplement, and managed care (HMO/PPO).

Writing Your Story

Max Kohr

10:00 – 11:30 am, Tuesdays

March 24 – April 7 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 members; $44 non-members

Learn to express yourself! Join us to get started writing and to avoid writers block. The emphasis will be on composing short stories. We will share ideas on how to edit and modify stories for the greatest impact.

Randy Wayne White, author of over 30 novels said: “Wouldn’t it be nice if your ancestors had written just a few paragraphs about their daily lives?” To help you to share the stories of your life, this course will include writing exercises in class plus writing prompts to do at home.

Max Kohr enjoys writing and sharing his stories. He spent 5 years participating in a Creative Writing class, and has kept a daily personal journal for the past 10 years. Max is a seasoned storyteller and has written over 100 speeches as a Distinguished Toastmaster. Come and see how much fun writing and sharing can be.

Michigan Wines!

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Tuesday

March 24

Cost: $25 members; $37 non-members

Back by popular demand, this class will discuss the rise of Michigan wines from the Detroit River to Traverse City. We will explore the grapes, wines, and areas that have the most potential for growth and success in the mitten state. Taste 6 Michigan wines during the evening. Students are invited to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Spring Wreath

Jennifer Cummins Linehan

2:00 – 3:00 pm, Thursday

April 2

Cost: $60 members; $72 non-members

Spring is here and it’s time for flowers! Craft your own unique keepsake wreath with silk flowers to celebrate the season. All materials will be provided to create a wreath for displaying inside or out.

Certified florist Jennifer Cummins Linehan owns and operates Beautiful Blooms by Jen.

The Religious Meaning of Grimms’ Magic Fairy Tales

Father John Blaser and Joseph Mascazine

9:30 – 11:30 am, Tuesdays

April 7 – 14 (2 weeks)

Cost: $29 members; $41 non-members

The Grimm Brother’s collection of stories are masterpieces of imagination and treasures belonging to our childhood. They include such favorites as Cinderella, Snow White, and Little Red Riding Hood. Fr. John Blaser and Joseph Mascazine will pursue the religious meanings of the Grimm collection.

Father John R. Blaser is a priest of the Diocese of Toledo. Since his retirement in 2009, he has taken up an interest in dream work at the Haden Institute in North Carolina where he was introduced to the work of Carl Jung.

Joseph Mascazine has had a long career in education, working with both children and adults. Currently he works as a reading tutor specializing in teaching dyslexic children and young adults. A course taught by Benedictine monks sparked Joseph’s interest in dreamwork and he has been studying dreams ever since.

Toledo Opera’s Spring Double Bill

Dr. Christopher Williams

3:30 – 5:00 pm, Tuesdays

April 7 – 14 (2 weeks)

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

Enjoy a discussion of Derrick Wang’s one-act opera Scalia/Ginsburg in the context of Wang’s own style and career and in light of a tradition of operatic courtroom/legal scenes (including works like Weill’s Lady in the Dark, Gershwin’s Of Thee I Sing, Britten’s Peter Grimes and Billy Budd, and Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi) and the comic legacy of the operettas of William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, epitomized by Trial by Jury.

Wines of California’s Central Coast

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Tuesday

April 7

Cost: $25 members; $37 non-members

One of the largest areas of California is also one of the most frequently overlooked. This large American viticultural area spans from Santa Barbara county to the south of San Francisco Bay. It is primarily known for chardonnay and pinot noir that is cooled by the influence of the Pacific Ocean. Learn other great facts and find a new favorite wine in this unique class. Taste 6 Californian wines during the evening. Students are invited to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Blooming Spring Centerpiece

Jennifer Cummins Linehan

2:00 – 3:00 pm, Thursday

April 9

Cost: $60 members; $72 non-members

Create your own floral centerpiece under the expert guidance of Toledo’s only certified floral designer! All you need to bring is your creativity and you will take home a burst of spring color. These fresh flowers will be perfect for your Easter celebrations.

Drowning in Paper

Karen Lucas

10:00 – 11:30 am, Thursday

April 16

Cost: $22 members; $34 non-members

Are you drowning in paper? You are not alone! Rafts of paper flood into the average home every single day. Paper clutter costs time, money and stress. Without a management plan, a household can drown in a rising tide of paper.

Learn about simple tips and techniques to help you set up and handle household filing systems, the daily mail, newspapers and magazines, children’s artwork, cards and correspondence, calendars, phone lists, menus, and more. Find out which important papers you need to keep, and for how long. Learn strategies for handling tax records and which papers should be saved in safety deposit boxes. Join us to learn how you can develop new systems and methods to handle your household papers.

Presented by Karen Lucas, owner of Your Professional Organizer, a service she created in 2013 to help people transition to a simple, more organized, less stressful way of living. Karen is a member of NAPO, the National Association of Professional Organizers.

Presidents of the 20th Century

Dr. Dwayne Beggs

3:00 – 4:00 pm, Thursdays

April 16 – May 21 (6 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

During the 20th century the United States experienced two World Wars, racial unrest and the Civil Rights Movement, the fight for Women’s rights (to vote among other issues), The Cold War, Regional Wars (Korean and Vietnam), and a terrorist attack on American Soil (1994 Bombing of the World Trade Center). During this century American Presidents had to deal with difficult domestic and foreign policy issues. During this course we will be looking at the Presidencies of Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Each of these Presidents dealt with significant domestic and foreign policy issues. Each week we will examine one of these 20th century Presidents paying particular attention to just how they handled the domestic and foreign issues that arose during their time in office.

Dr. Dwayne Beggs has taught popular classes on many military conflicts for Lifelong Learning. Dr. Beggs earned a M.A. and a Ph.D. in U.S. Diplomatic History from BGSU. He also holds an M. Div. and served as a Youth Pastor / Associate Pastor for 22 years.

The Mythic West

Dr. Adam Hodge

1:00 – 2:30 pm, Fridays

April 17 – May 1 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 members; $44 non-members

The American West is shrouded in mythology. Thanks to well over a century of popular media, government, and even academic treatments of the Western past and present, so much of what is presented as fact is, in fact, fiction. By examining a few myths and myth-makers – such as the notion of the lawless West, ideas about pristine Western wilderness, and how William F. Cody popularized his vision of Western history – we can gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of the West, historically and today. And doing so allows us to appreciate how popular culture shapes historical memory.

Dr. Adam Hodge is Associate Professor and Chair of History at Lourdes. His research focuses on the environmental and Indigenous history of the American West. He earned degrees from Thiel College (B.A.), Kent State University (M.A.), and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Ph.D).

Bridge: All About Notrump Bridge

Ben Beazley

10:00 – noon, Saturdays

April 18 – May 2 (3 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

Bridge players: make the most of your notrump hands. Three sessions on bidding, playing, and defending notrump bids. We will include bids to disrupt opponents’ bids. Hands will be bid, played, and discussed. Take advantage of this opportunity to improve your play in this important area of bridge.

Ben Beazley has been a Bridge Life Master for many years and enjoys playing regularly in local duplicate games. He has extensive experience as a bridge instructor; he has tutored students individually and taught UT faculty groups as well as courses at Belmont Country Club and the Ottawa Hills Village Life Program.

Spanish Conversation

Raquel Bravo

10:00 – 11:30 am, Mondays & Wednesdays (meets twice per week)

Session 2: April 20 – May 20

Cost: $58 members; $70 non-members

Come speak Spanish with us! Whether you’re planning a trip abroad or learning for fun, this is a comfortable and supportive way to learn. Class time will focus on this beautiful Latin language with useful vocabulary and scenario dialogues, as well as a little of its culture and history. Students are invited to practice Spanish during lunch at the Lourdes Café after class (price of lunch not included).

Raquel Bravo is a native Spanish speaker who has taught English/Spanish bilingual education and adult education. She is a retired school administrator who has enjoyed traveling to Spain, Mexico and South America extensively. She is eager to share her love of the Spanish language with you!

A Basic Understanding of Islam

Dr. Bahu S. Shaikh

10:30 – noon, Monday

April 20

Cost: $22 members; $34 non-members

In the Muslim holy book the Quran, people who follow Judaism, Christianity and Islam are all considered “the people of the book.” We all believe in the same God. To understand the connections better, we will explore the basics of Islam and the many commonalities it has with Christianity. Ultimately, increased understanding of Islam will promote better understanding between people from all the major Abrahamic religions.

Bahu S. Shaikh, M.D, was inspired by Bill Baker’s book More In Common Than You Think: The Bridge Between Islam And Christianity. He is a member of Islamic Center of Greater Toledo and a founding member of Muslim Christian Dialogue Group based at the First Presbyterian Church of Maumee Ohio. He has been a speaker at the Islamic Center as well at the Maumee church.

Sculpting with Line. Drawing with Wire.

Patrick Dubreuil

5:00 – 7:30 pm, Mondays

April 20 – May 25 (6 weeks)

Cost: $115 members; $127 non-members

Often a sculpture begins with lines drawn on paper, and that is where this class will begin. By defining the subject matter through the understanding of line and basic shape, we will draw a subject on paper then break it down into contour and cross contour lines.

Next, we will transform ordinary soft wire into a representation of your subject, shaping flexible black wire to mirror the lines on the page. We will be working with wire on wire connection only, so there will be no soldering. The finished sculpture is yours to take home to display inside or outside.

Harmful Algal Blooms and Your Water Bill

Marya Czech

10:00 – noon, Wednesday

April 22

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

Most of us drink water from Lake Erie and trust its purity and safety. With yearly increases in the concentration of toxins from harmful algal blooms in the Western Lake Erie Basin, the treatment of our water will become a greater challenge to water purification systems and will be reflected in the cost of our residential water. Is enough being done to alleviate this problem, and can we water consumers, stakeholders, and rate payers weigh in with good advice? Co-presenter Nick Komives, chair of Water Committee and member of Toledo City Council, will share perspectives from the City of Toledo.

Marya Czech is a retired professor from the Lourdes University Biology Department and currently works as a regional environmentalist.

Art of the Afterlife

Kristin Baldeschwiler

4:00 – 6:00 pm, Wednesdays

April 22 – May 27 (6 weeks)

Cost: $86 members; $98 non-members

You CAN take it with you (and many people have)! Explore the funerary and memorial art of many nations and cultures, including those in our own back yard. Funerary art is any work of art forming, or placed inside, a repository for the remains of the dead. The deposit of remains with an apparent aesthetic intention is found in nearly all cultures; many of the best-known artistic creations of past cultures—the Egyptian pyramids, the Terracotta Army, the Sutton Hoo ship burial, and the Taj Mahal—are funerary works of art.

Kristin Baldeschwiler, a 2003 graduate of Lourdes, received her BA in Art History, works in medical education, and currently serves as the Historian for the Toledo Federation of Arts Societies.

United Nations Global Sustainability Goals

Dr. Andy Jorgensen

10:30 – noon, Thursdays

April 23 – 30

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

In 2015, the United Nations adopted a set of 17 goals to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all as part of sustainable development agenda. Each goal had specific targets to be achieved by 2030. This course will examine several of those goals including good health, clean water, decent work, quality education and gender equality. Hear about the progress made so far and what the UN hopes to achieve. The information will be highlighted by short videos provided by the UN. Audience response devices will help everyone engage with the material.

Dr. Andy Jorgensen is Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at UT and a Senior Fellow, National Council for Science and the Environment.

Energy In and Energy Out

Dr. Andy Jorgensen

1:00 – 2:30 pm, Thursdays

April 23 – 30

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

Where and how do we get energy, and how do we use this important commodity? Humans have worked to move energy around for as long as we have been in existence. Today we transform the stored energy of fossil fuels to heat our homes and drive our vehicles. We convert the energy of sunlight to electricity which lights our homes and powers our air conditioners – and even some cars. This class will look at present and historical information regarding energy into our society and energy out as it is being used. It will also provide context for understanding changes in the coal and nuclear industries, such as the recent law aimed at keeping the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant open. Renewal energy sources and uses will be emphasized.

Dr. Andy Jorgensen is Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at UT and a Senior Fellow, National Council for Science and the Environment.

Narratives & Tutelage from the First Peoples

Barbara Mauter

10:00 – noon, Friday

April 24

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

Explore some of the Native American lessons one might apply to our present day. Plan to join Barbara Mauter in this insightful workshop, where she will share selected readings from her collection of Native American literature, along with a few of her own experiences.

Keeping Your Keys

Jamie Blazevich

10:00 – 11:30 am, Fridays

April 24 – May 15 (4 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

Gain the confidence and skills necessary to drive safely for longer as a mature driver. Learn how certain medications and hearing loss affect driving ability. Discover the reasons why people tend to drive distractedly. Hear experts from ODOT, AAA, and the Ohio State Highway Patrol discuss all aspects of safe driving, including roundabouts. The final week of this class will include CarFit check-ups. Trained technicians will assess how well your car fits you, from steering wheel tilt to mirror adjustments that eliminate blind spots.

Jamie Blazevich, M.S. Ed.is the Lucas County Traffic Safety Program Coordinator with the Ohio Department of Public Safety.

Women’s Rights In Islam

Dr. Bahu S. Shaikh

10:30 – noon, Monday

April 27

Cost: $22 members; $34 non-members

Women’s issues are a major topic of misunderstanding about women’s rights and the treatment of women in Islam. Much of this is based on the cultural and social norms within Muslim countries. This class will cover what Islam actually preaches regarding women based on the Quran. It will cover the subject of spiritual equality, equal rewards from God, property rights, choice in marriage and divorce, as well as economic and property rights.

Wines of Southern France

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Tuesday

May 12

Cost: $25 members; $37 non-members

Sample wines from the Rhone to Bordeaux and all points in between! We will delve into some of the major influences that these historic areas have had on wine, and why you need to know about them! 6 wines will be provided for tastings. Students are invited to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Silk Scarf Painting

Sharon Havelak

1:00 – 3:00 pm, Wednesdays

May 6 – 27 (4 weeks)

Cost: $83 members; $95 non-members

Looking for that perfect scarf? Try painting it! Explore the delight of painting a silk scarf with fiber reactive dyes. You will have the opportunity to paint at least three scarves, using different painting techniques. No previous experience necessary, just bring your creativity! All materials will be provided.

Sister Sharon Havelak, OSF, is an artist and adjunct instructor at Lourdes University. She previously managed All Good Things, a gift shop and gallery that offers items made by the Sisters of St Francis, but now gives more of her time to her art.

Creative Cards

Sr. Roselynn Humbert

1:00 – 3:00 pm, Fridays

May 8 – 22 (3 weeks)

Cost: $41 members; $53 non-members

Craft your own unique greeting cards with experienced card maker Sister Roselynn. Each class will provide you with instructions and materials for 3 cards. Holiday themes as well as birthday, get well, and sympathy designs will be presented. Tap into your artistic side with projects that can be completed in a short time with a minimum of materials. Techniques used in this class will include: die cutting, embossing, watercolor, stamping, and using stickers.

Bridge: Improve Your Game

Ben Beazley

10:00 – noon, Saturday

May 9 – 23 (3 weeks)

Cost: $43 members; $55 non-members

Have more fun at bridge by adding some poplar and useful bidding conventions to your game! How to bid two suited hands, negative doubles, and preemptive hands will be played and discussed. A great time to build your knowledge of this great game.

Blood: A River Of Life

Dr. Bahu S. Shaikh

10:30 – noon, Monday

May 18

Cost: $22 members; $34 non-members

In every culture and religion, blood is symbolic of life. In our bodies, blood cells not only carry oxygen, which is essential for life, but also perform several other vital functions in the body. White cells help fight infections and the platelets help stop bleeding. This class will explain how important the blood is to our very existence, as well as its cultural meanings and significance.

Bahu S. Shaikh, M.D, is a Clinical Professor of Medicine specializing in Hematology and Medical Oncology. As a member of the Toledo Clinic group he has also served as the Director of the Hickman Cancer at Flower Hospital in Sylvania.

Black Holes

Laura Megeath

10:30 – 11:30 am, Tuesday

May 19

Cost: $17 members; $29 non-members

Deep in the middle of our Milky Way galaxy lies an object made famous by science fiction—a supermassive black hole. The current science of black holes lets us take a simulated flight inside one of these mysterious objects, as well as witness immersive animations of the formation of the early universe, star birth and death, and the collision of giant galaxies.

After the show in the Appold Planetarium, continue the conversation over lunch at the Lourdes Café (cost of lunch not included).

Laura Megeath is the Coordinator of both Lifelong Learning and the Appold Planetarium.

Truly American Ecology – Seeing with Eyes of the Heart

Marya Czech

10:00 – noon, Thursday

May 21

Cost: $24 members; $36 non-members

Although sciences require research, weights, measures, and plenty of numbers in order to be credible, many historic American ecologists have painted beautiful (and understandable) word pictures of their field work. Aldo Leopold’s “Green Fire” is an example of the “ah-ha” moment which influenced his perspective. The writings of Leopold and several other of Marya Czech’s favorite ecologists will help us to experience the environment with our senses and inspire us to be more effective stewards of our natural surroundings.

Do you have a talent or area of expertise you’d like to share?

Call 419-824-3707 to become a Lifelong Learning instructor!