LifelongLearningProgram

You may register for the following activities, classes, and events by contacting 419-824-3707 or email lifelong@lourdes.edu.

Registration may be made by credit card or check. Checks should be made payable to LULL (Lourdes University Lifelong Learning) and mailed to: Lourdes University Lifelong Learning, 6832 Convent Blvd. Sylvania OH 43560.

Lifelong Learning Summer Registration Form

Taste Wine Like a Pro

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Monday

September 9

Cost: $25 for members; $37 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Come and exercise your pallet as we dissect and discuss six different wines. Learn what to look for in a wine, how to smell it and taste it critically. We’ll work as a group to describe the key features of each wine. This class will help to sharpen your skills of discernment and build your wine vocabulary. A great opportunity for new wine drinkers to build their tasting skills and experienced wine drinkers to sharpen theirs. Students are welcomed to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Nicholas Kubiak is a Certified Specialist of Wine and Spirits and a veteran of our local wine industry.

Spanish Conversation

Raquel Bravo

10 – 11:30 am, Mondays & Wednesdays (twice per week over 5 weeks)

Session I: September 9 – October 9

Session II: October 30 – November 25

Cost per session: $58 for members; $70 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Come speak Spanish with us! Whether you’re planning a trip abroad or learning for fun, this is a comfortable and supportive way to learn. Class time will focus on this beautiful Latin language with useful vocabulary and scenario dialogues, as well as a little of its culture and history. Students are invited to practice Spanish during lunch at the Lourdes Café after class (price of lunch not included). This class will use the textbook Spanish for Dummies published by Susana Wald and Cecie Kraynak.

Raquel Bravo is a native Spanish speaker who has taught English/Spanish bilingual education and adult education. She is a retired school administrator who has enjoyed traveling to Spain, Mexico and South America extensively. She is eager to share her love of the Spanish language with you!

Photo Organization

Karen Lucas

10 – 11:30 am, Tuesday

September 10

Cost: $22 for members; $34 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Are you overwhelmed with your photos? Look around your house and ask yourself,” How many printed photos do I have in frames, photo albums, or loose in drawers?” Then think about all the photos you have on your digital camera or phone. Learn how to get them organized, store them safely and select the best images that keep your best moments and memories alive.

Presented by Karen Lucas, owner of Your Professional Organizer, a service she created in 2013 to help people transition to a simple, more organized, less stressful way of living. Karen is a member of NAPO, the National Association of Professional Organizers.

Great Lakes: Gift of the Glaciers

Marya Czech

10 – 11:30 am, Thursdays

September 12 – October 10 (5 weeks)

Cost: $19 for members; $31 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Our part of the Midwest has North America’s youngest topography laid on the oldest exposed rock strata on Earth. Once at the equator, our land has moved over millennia to its current location by continental drift. We will explore the “tossed salad” of Great Lakes geology, the result of four separate ice ages which scoured, remodeled, and refilled fjord-like cracks with the ice melt in which we fish and swim today. This course will cover aspects of the lakes ranging from their formation to economic importance to current efforts to protect them. Guest speaker Matt Markey, Blade Outdoors Editor, will share family experiences of camping and fishing in favorite Great Lakes spots.

Marya Czech is a retired professor from the Lourdes University Biology Department and currently works as a regional environmentalist.

Madoff: the Fraud of the Century

John Scott

10 – 11:30 am, Mondays

September 16 – October 14 (5 weeks)

Cost: $54 for members; $66 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

From humble beginnings, Bernie Madoff rose to be a wealthy trusted wall-street insider. Eventually his meteoric fall made him the face of financial disaster for a generation. In this course we will dive into how Bernie Madoff created, ran, concealed, and created the largest ponzi scheme in American history. Finally we will discuss the victims, many of whom lost everything they had, and those who took their lives because of this disaster.

John Scott is a Lourdes University history student who recently completed a research project on the Kennedys under the direction of Dr. Dwayne Beggs.

Notre Dame de Paris: What was, What is, What will be

Chris Rilling

1 – 3 pm, Tuesday

September 17

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Learn about the construction and history of the world’s most iconic Gothic cathedral, Notre Dame. Devastated by a fire in April 2019, we will assess the damage comparing what was lost and what remains. Everyone is eagerly waiting to see what the future holds for this famous cathedral.

Chris Rilling is both an educator and artist. After receiving a Masters in Art Education from University of Toledo, Chris taught art and art history at Owens Community College and Northview High School.

Basics of Essential Oils

Blake and Jessica Easter

10 – 11:30 am, Wednesday

September 18

Cost: $27 for members; $39 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

What are essential oils? Why is everyone talking about them? How do they work and how can I benefit from them? What are the top 10 oils that would benefit my family the most? These questions and more will be covered in this introductory class. Learn how to support our health naturally by using what nature provides through essential oils. Everyone will make a full sized essential oil item to take home.

Blake and Jessica Easter travel the United States teaching about the natural health benefits of using essential oils in everyday life as a “Plan A” for what ails you. The Easters have empowered many people toward a life of wellness and addressing the root problems rather than “just treating symptoms.”

Freedom of the Press

Dr. Shari O’Brien

1:30 – 3:45 pm, Wednesdays

September 18 – October 9 (4 weeks)

Cost: $65 for members; $77 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

“Congress shall make no law… abridging freedom… of the press.” With these ten words, the First Amendment protects what James Madison called one of the great bulwarks of liberty. But to what extent does the freedom of the press protect defamatory publications ruinous to a reputation or indecent broadcastings like George Carlin’s famous monologue? How are competing interests like the right to a fair trial balanced against press access to proceedings? How has the Supreme Court applied free press guarantees vis-à-vis national security matters as in the publication of the Pentagon Papers? Join us to explore these and other questions as we survey the history of the freedom of the press and the case law that has evolved around it. Both new and continuing constitutional law students will be enriched by a course that will culminate with a review of the highlights of the US Supreme Court’s most recent term.

Dr. Shari O’Brien earned an M.A. from University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from BGSU. After graduating magna cum laude from UT College of Law, she worked in the United States District Court. Publishing five law review articles as well as hundreds of essays and poems in national journals, she taught writing and poetry for twenty-seven years at UT and continues today to practice law.

Finding Poetry Workshop

Barbara Mauter

10 am – noon, Friday

September 20

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Have you ever wanted to write a poem, but felt writer’s block, at a loss for words, or just daunted by the whole idea? Plan to attend this hands on “Found Poetry” workshop, and see how you can create your own poem. You will be guided through the steps to create an original poem or two of your own. Bring a pen!

Barbara Mauter started writing poetry as a teen. Since then, she has had numerous poems selected for publication. She has always enjoyed the way in which words can convey meaning.

Creative Conversation

Max Kohr

10 – 11:30 am, Tuesdays

September 24 – October 8 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 for members; $44 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Having fun will be an essential part of this course, while we learn more about table talk, introductions, storytelling and telling a joke. If you only want to speak to a small group of friends or a larger audience, this course is sure to give you tips on how to get your points across. Learn new speaking skills at this “How To” workshop based on the concepts of “Simply Speaking”. Overcome your fear in a comfortable and supportive environment as we strive to become more effective communicators.

Max Kohr is a seasoned speaker, workshop presenter and Distinguished Toastmaster. His motto is “Don’t let the truth get in the way of a good story.”

Science and Religion

Dr. Andy Jorgensen

1 – 2:30 pm, Thursdays

September 26 – October 3 (2 weeks)

Cost: $22 for members; $34 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

This course examines various views on the relationship between science and religion.  It is based primarily on the ideas expressed in the Ian Barbour book When Science Meets Religion: Enemies, Strangers, or Partners? Barbour categorizes this relationship into four paths: Conflict, Independence, Dialogue and Integration. He then places major ideas in the context of each of these paths: creation, evolution, and quantum physics among others  He includes some key ideas of individuals in each of these paths.  Reading the book is recommended but not required. The book may be rented at the Lourdes Bookstore for $8 or purchased for $15. Group discussion will be a significant component of the course.

Dr. Andy Jorgensen is Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry & Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo and Senior Fellow at the National Council for Science and the Environment. Dr. Jorgensen previously taught the science of climate change for Lifelong Learning.

Goal Setting

Daniel J. Jachimiak

10 – 11 am, Friday

September 27

Cost: $17 for members; $29 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

One of the greatest discoveries is that your life can become a great life when you clearly identify what it is you want, make a plan to achieve it, and then work on that plan every single day.

You can set goals using the S.M.A.R.T. Goal Setting technique. S.M.A.R.T. is an acronym, giving criteria to guide in the setting of objectives such as personal development and project management. The principle advantage of S.M.A.R.T. objectives is that they are easier to understand and to know when they are done.

Join retired teacher and social worker Dan Jachimiak for a journey and study of successful people, including a Nobel Prize winner. Combine this goal setting class with the time management class to maximize your learning experience.

Time Management

Daniel J. Jachimiak

10 – 11 am, Friday

October 4

Cost: $17 for members; $29 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

We all have 24 hours in a day. So why does is seem that some people are able to get the most out of every moment of every day? These people do not have the power to slow down time. They do, however, know how to properly manage their time.

How can you become a master of time management as well? Attend this informative and educational class including over 20 powerful time management strategies, including creating a time audit and getting organized. Also included is a discussion and explanation of the Quadrant matrix devised by Stephen Covey for use in time management.

Conversational Greek

Basil Apostolou

2 – 3:30 pm, Mondays

September 30 – November 18 (8 weeks)

Cost: $79 for members; $91 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Learn Greek! We promise a comfortable environment for exploring this beautiful language. You will learn conversational skills for everyday activities, such as meeting people and ordering in a restaurant, as well as insights into Greek traditions and culture. The focus will be interpersonal communication rather than grammar. The Greek alphabet will not be taught but phonetics will be used. No prior knowledge of Greek is required.

Basil Apostolou lived in Greece until he emigrated to the U.S. at the age of 19. He has taught others to speak Greek as a teacher and director at Holy Trinity Cathedral Greek School in Toledo.

Early 20th Century Art: the Start of the “Isms”

Chris Rilling

1 – 3 pm, Tuesday

October 1

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

After the turn of the century, artists no longer looked to conform to a particular conventional style or group. While growing out of the traditions of the past, conforming to the conventional traditions becomes less important. New movements arose such as Expressionism, Cubism, Fauvism, and more.

Second World War Small Arms

Tom Pillbeams

10 – 11:30 am, Wednesdays

October 2 – 30 (5 weeks)

Cost: $54 for members; $66 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Second World War Small Arms will cover advances in technology, military doctrine, and industrial background that led to the development of these weapons as well as their implementation, use, feedback from the front, and eventual replacement by each nation. This class will focus on the military issue rifles and pistols of the main belligerent countries, and will touch on machine guns and sub machine guns as well. Students will be able to handle real Second World War small arms. This class is targeted at people that have an interest in World War Two but would like to seek a greater understanding of the small arms used. It may also benefit someone looking to start collecting rather than an advanced collector.

Discussing and handling these weapons can help us gain further perspective of the experience of millions of men and women that fought in this massive global conflict. All firearms will remain unloaded and firearm safety strictly observed. A brief overview on firearm safety will be conducted at the beginning of class.

Tom Pillbeams graduated from Michigan State University as a History Major with his primary focus on WWII.

The Symphonic Worlds of Gustav Mahler

Dr. Christopher Williams

3:30 – 5 pm, Mondays

October 7 – 28 (4 weeks)

Cost: $43 for members; $55 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

In conversation with the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius, one of his most famous Vienna schoolmates, Gustav Mahler proclaimed that a symphony should not be limited by convention or its own internal purely musical arguments, but should instead embrace the world in all of its variety.

Over a twenty-five-year career that ended with his premature death in 1911, Mahler proceeded to live up to this phrase, producing several orchestral songs, nine completed symphonies, a song-symphony, and a torso of a tenth symphony. These works, in some cases incorporating vocal soloists and choruses, as well as the largest orchestras ever used, explore extremes of passionate emotion, explosive drama, irony, humor, tragedy, and even bitterness.

Some writers have compared his symphonies to novels; Mahler himself saw Dostoevsky as a model. At least three of these works were among the longest and biggest works of symphonic music yet attempted. At the same time, Mahler was one of the most hard-working and influential conductors of orchestral and operatic music of his or any other generation, shaping attitudes to the music of many other composers that hold sway to this day.

Although Mahler’s works remained obscure outside niche circles for much of the twentieth-century, tireless efforts by Leonard Bernstein and others after his 1960 centennial succeeded in vaulting him to one of the most beloved and popular composers in the concert hall. His complete symphonic output has been recorded dozens of times, and the Toledo Symphony has performed nearly all of his works, with his massive Second Symphony the triumphant closing highlight of Alain Trudel’s first full season as the TSO’s music director.

The music of Mahler played a central role in the instructor’s doctoral dissertation.

Australian Wines

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Monday

October 7

Cost: $25 for members; $37 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Learn how this vast flat, arid land with no native grapes became such a powerhouse in the wine world.  More than just kangaroos and koalas, Australia has been steadily and vigorously growing and cultivating 130 different grape varietals and has been noted by critic Matt Kramer as “the most powerful influence in wine today”.

Students are welcomed to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

The WPA Legacy in Toledo

Kristen Baldeschwiler

4 – 6 pm, Wednesdays

October 9 – 23 (3 weeks)

Cost: $43 for members; $55 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

As part of The New Deal, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was created to alleviate the mass unemployment of the Great Depression. The majority of WPA projects built infrastructure, such as bridges, schools, and parks.

Many Toledoans know that our local WPA legacy includes five historic buildings at the Toledo Zoo, as well as the Main Branch of the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. But, did you know that Glass Bowl Stadium was a project of the WPA? Or the Ottawa Park Amphitheater? Let’s explore these sites, and more around town, together!

Kristin Baldeschwiler, a 2003 graduate of Lourdes, received her BA in Art History, works in medical education, and currently serves as the Historian for the Toledo Federation of Arts Societies.

Marian Apparitions and Social Unrest

Nathan Rawlins

4 – 5:30 pm, Thursdays

October 10 – November 7 (5 weeks)

Cost: $54 for members; $66 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Apparitions of the Blessed Mother hold a special place in the heart of many Catholics and are a curiosity to many others. Most often, Marian apparitions come at a time when the potential for extreme violence and political backlash lay in waiting. In this class we will begin to understand five of the most notable appearances (Guadalupe, Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, Lourdes, Fatima and Garabandal) and we will explore the societal changes and unrest occurring at the time of the apparition.

Nathan Rawlins is graduate of Lourdes University holding a Masters Degree in Theology. Professor Rawlins currently teaches an introductory course in Theology for Lourdes University during the fall semester.

The Pied Piper of Toledo: Museum Director George Stevens

Julie McMaster

11:30 am – 12:30 pm, Friday

October 11

Cost: $17 for members; $29 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

In a January 1938 article from Fortune Magazine, George Washington Stevens was named “The Pied Piper of Toledo.” Why was this newspaperman named the Toledo Museum’s second director? Who was he?  What made him so successful? Learn more about this remarkable man, his life and philosophies which created the foundation of the Toledo Museum of Art.

Julie McMaster is the Toledo Museum of Art’s Archivist.

The Transformative Power of Fairy Tales

Father John Blaser and Joseph Mascazine

10 am – noon, Tuesdays

October 15 – 22 (2 weeks)

Cost: $36 for members; $48 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Written thousands of years ago, fairy tales historically have their roots in adult literature and were not written for children. Fairy tales, like other stories or myths, offer ample material for the understanding of our human behavior and relationships. With help of Jungian psychology, we will reflect on how fairy tales serve as a mirror or icon of our psyche and generate transformative energy. Marie-Louise von Franz, a pupil and collaborator of C.G. Jung, says that fairy tales are a spontaneous and simple expression of the psyche (soul). Some of the themes which will be touched on are: the Shadow, anima/animus, conscious/unconscious, and archetypes. No prior knowledge of Jungian psychology is necessary.

Father John R. Blaser is a priest of the Diocese of Toledo. Since his retirement in 2009, he  has taken up an interest in dream work at the Haden Institute in North Carolina where he was introduced to the work of Carl Jung.

Joseph Mascazine has had a long career in education, working with both children and adults. Currently he works as a reading tutor specializing in teaching dyslexic children and young adults. A course taught by Benedictine monks sparked Joseph’s interest in dreamwork and he has been studying dreams ever since.

Essential Oils and Women’s Health

Blake and Jessica Easter

10 – 11:30 am, Wednesday

October 16

Cost: $27 for members; $39 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Hormones, hormones, hormones. Can’t live with them. Can’t live without them. More and more we hear of women who struggle with their hormones whether it be with intense menstrual cycles, endometriosis, PCOS, or menopause.

Come and learn how we can use essential oils to better regulate our bodies naturally. Everyone will make a full sized essential oil item to take home. Learn how we can support our health naturally by using what nature provides through essential oils.

A Tumultuous Period of Change: 1968 through the 1970s

Dale Lanigan

2 – 3:30 pm, Wednesdays

October 23 – November 13 (4 weeks)

Cost: $43 for members; $55 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

This course will examine, from legal, social and political perspectives, the turbulent, fascinating and consequential period from the Chicago protests at the Democratic National Convention of 1968 through the election of President Reagan in 1980. The focus will be on key political figures, events and court decisions associated with the Civil Rights and Antiwar movements in the United States. Also discussed will be the long term impact of those times on future generations.

Dale Lanigan is Director of the Criminal Justice Program and Chairperson and Assistant Professor of Sociology & Justice Studies at Lourdes University.

Sugar – the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Barbara Mauter

10 am – noon, Friday

October 25

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Back by request, an informative workshop on sugar! We will explore the history of sugar, and its dramatic increase in today’s foods. Topics covered will include: need, cravings, health hazards, hidden and artificial sugars, plus the outlook for the future.

Barbara Mauter is an adjunct instructor with over 20 years’ experience teaching college. She has taught and presented various workshops for UT, BGSU, Monroe County Community College and Owens State Community College. Her interests center around thinking, reading and how our minds work. She is known for her critical thinking class activities.

What’s so Great about Shakespeare?

Patricia Schnapp, RSM, PhD

10 – 11:30 am, Mondays

October 28 – November 11 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 for members; $44 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

“Shakespeare” is, for many people, a scary name. It tends to conjure up highbrow language incomprehensible to all but Jeopardy wannabes. And it’s supposedly cruel and unusual punishment when foisted on innocent high school students—who tend to remember (if they do) only one line of the Bard: “It was Greek to me!” So! in these classes we will try to de-mystify the Swan of Avon and have some fun—and enlightenment—about the most famous poet and playwright the world has ever seen. We will explore some of the unforgettable characters Shakespeare gave us— like Hamlet, Iago, Lady Macbeth and Desdemona.

We’ll also review some of his intriguing plots, both comic and tragic as well as a couple of his most famous sonnets as well. Why does he still dazzle readers and audiences? What’s so great about Shakespeare? Come and find out!

Patricia Schnapp, PhD, is a retired professor of English, a poet, and a Sister of Mercy. Currently, she volunteers in prisons as a teacher and chaplain and at a homeless shelter. She continues to write.

Crocheting: Stitching Together

Mary Jo Blohm

10 am – noon, Tuesdays

October 29 – November 19 (4 weeks)

Cost: $59 for members; $71 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Work on your crocheting with us! If you know basic crochet stitches then this class is for you. Bring your project, yarn and hooks. We will review some stitches and help with pattern reading. Class size is limited to allow for individual attention.

Mary Jo Blohm is retired and enjoys traveling, reading and crafting. She was introduced to crocheting at an early age and has taught herself to follow various patterns and create individualized projects. Some of her crocheted items are sold at All Good Things.

Creative Cards

Sr. Roselynn Humbert

1 – 3 pm, Fridays

October 25, November 8, 15 (3 weeks)

Cost: $41 for members; $53 for non-members

Room Location: Regina Hall Conference Room

Craft your own unique greeting cards with experienced card maker Sister Roselynn. Each class will provide you with instructions and materials for 3 cards. Holiday themes as well as birthday, get well, and sympathy designs will be presented. Tap into your artistic side with projects that can be completed in a short time with a minimum of materials. Techniques used in this class will include: die cutting, embossing, watercolor, stamping, and using stickers.

The Will of the People: Readings in American Democracy

Hugh Grefe

1:30 – 3 pm, Tuesdays

October 29 – November 19 (4 weeks)

Cost: $56 for members; $68 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

With the powerful impact of the digital age and social media, there are daily challenges to the functioning of the U.S. as one of the world’s oldest democracies. Indeed, our democracy rises out of the ideas enshrined in documents nearly 250 years old. How relevant are these ideas and documents today? How are we still grappling with the same issues that inspired and bedeviled our forebears? How are modern issues different? In the midst of the super-heated rhetoric of current debate, what can we learn from our nation’s historical conversations?

The book for this course, The Will of the People: Readings in American Democracy, brings together 14 monumental texts and invites discussion of their meaning and continuing significance. Join in a discussion of our nation’s rich and challenging efforts to achieve a more perfect democracy.

Published by the Great Books Foundation, The Will of the People will be available for purchase at the Lourdes University bookstore for $17.

Facilitator Hugh Grefe earned a Master of Arts in History at the University of Toledo and has served in a variety of senior staff and board roles in the greater Toledo community. In 2002 he was awarded a Fannie Mae Foundation Fellowship to participate in the Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

Exploring the Mandala

Sister Sharon Havelak, OSF

1 – 3 pm, Thursdays

October 31 – November 14 (3 weeks)

Cost: $43 for members; $55 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Discover an ancient art form that offers a wealth of benefits. Working with mandalas offers an experience of entering into wholeness and healing, a technique for opening up oneself to creativity, and a means of entering into a state of contemplation and peace. We will use colored pencils and/or markers to create a personal mandala. No previous drawing experience necessary.

Sister Sharon Havelak, OSF, is an artist and adjunct instructor at Lourdes University. She currently works at All Good Things, a gift shop and gallery that offers items made by the Sisters of St Francis. Making mandalas is one of her favorite prayer techniques.

Opium Dreams and “Perpetrated Monstrosities:” A 150-year Retrospective on the Music and Career of the Remarkable Hector Berlioz

Dr. Christopher Williams

3:30 – 5 pm, Mondays

November 4 – 18 (3 weeks)

Cost: $32 for members; $44 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Although he does not enjoy quite the popular name recognition of a Mozart, Beethoven, or Tchaikovsky, Hector Berlioz (1803-1869) was the quintessential Romantic composer and arguably one of the most fascinating characters in the history of music. The son of a country doctor, he pursued a path as an outsider, first to conventional forms of musical training, then to conventional ways of expressing himself, and then to conventional ways of building a musical career (most of his income was generated from writing music journalism). Along the way he became personally acquainted with all the musical greats of his day and influenced most of them. He scored his first sensation with the “Symphonie fantastique,” a garish piece of program music based in the fantasies of an opium dream.

He then proceeded to “break the mold” with every subsequent composition, blending concerto with poetry, symphony with opera, church music with circus spectacular, and producing three of the most original and difficult operas of the 19th century, their difficulty rooted in his convention-smashing devotion to literary models and the extraordinary demands he placed on both singers and instrumentalists. Every one of these works flopped in his lifetime but has found a secure place in today’s concert and opera house repertories.

As many orchestras and record companies observe the 150th anniversary of Berlioz’s death, this class offers Lourdes students an opportunity to become broadly acquainted with this figure’s unique, dramatic, and quirkily unforgettable contributions to the classical music canon.

New Zealand

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Monday

November 4

Cost: $25 for members; $37 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

A mostly maritime cool climate that produces some of the most unique Pinot Noirs and Sauvignon Blancs in the world, New Zealand traces its wine history back only to the 19th century. This island nation is diverse and changes significantly depending on location. We’ll discuss the north and south islands, the soils and climate and how they impact what you smell and taste in you glass.

Students are welcomed to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Pop, Op, and Slop

Chris Rilling

1 – 3 pm, Tuesday

November 5

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

The fierceness and carnage of World War I and World War II affected the entire world and artists reacted in unique ways. While some artists choose to work through the psychological damage, these artists chose to avoid the horrors of war and embrace and embrace the “new.”

How do Ancestry Tests Work?

Marya Czech

10 – 11:30 am, Thursday

November 7

Cost: $19 for members; $31 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

A number of genetic testing companies offer “ancestry” services, promising that from a DNA sample to connect long-lost relatives and to tell users from which part of the world their ancestors came. Spin-offs from the Human Genome Project were originally pitched to inform users about genetic conditions to which they may be susceptible based on their maternal and paternal inheritance. How are these tests performed and how much useful information do they supply?

Indigenous Words

Barbara Mauter

1 – 2:30 pm, Friday

November 8

Cost: $22 for members; $34 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

In celebration of Native American Heritage month, come immerse yourself in selected original peoples’ poetry. The interconnectedness and grounding of Native writing will be explored through the “voice” of various Native American writers and artists. Historically, their traditions and stories were passed down and shared through their oral (spoken) language. Several copies of poems will be shown in Native tongue, along with English translations.

Compass, Calendar, Clock

Laura Megeath

10:30 – 11:30 am, Thursday

November 21

Cost: $17 for members; $29 for non-members

Room Location: Appold Planetarium

As our ancients learned, the sky is not just a thing of beauty—it is the ruler for the position of our planet. Understanding how our planet is aligned with the distance stars allows anyone to use the sky as a compass, a calendar and a clock. Come see the sky in a different light!

After the show in the Appold Planetarium, continue the conversation over lunch at the Lourdes Café (cost of lunch not included).

Laura Megeath is the Coordinator of both Lifelong Learning and the Appold Planetarium.

Chilean Wines for Chilly Nights

Nicholas Kubiak

6:30 – 8:30 pm, Monday

December 2

Cost: $25 for members; $37 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Let’s tango through the Andes and learn how “the end of the world” does wine. The expansive countries of Chile and Argentina have drawn explorers to their lands for decades in hopes of finding greatness. We’ll compare the two southerly countries and taste how their wines are affected by various flat lands, mountains or valleys. Don’t miss this class! It’s the perfect break from holiday shopping and cold nights.

Students are welcomed to bring their own food for pairings, as food will not be provided.

Post-Modern Art

Chris Rilling

1 – 3 pm, Tuesday

December 3

Cost: $20 for members; $32 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

Explore the post-modern art movement in which the most important characteristic of an artist was seen as expressive individualism.  Being different solely for the sake of being different became the hallmark of a “good” artist.

The Christmas Truce

Dr. Steve Bare

1:30 – 2:30 pm, Thursday

December 12

Cost: $17 for members; $29 for non-members

Room Location: TBD

During World War I, as trench warfare set in on the Western Front at the end of 1914, a curious event occurred between the Germans and British in Flanders, Belgium at Christmastime. The guns fell silent, and soldiers on each side climbed out of their respective trenches and celebrated Christmas together – “The Christmas Truce of 1914.” In this course we will explore the run-up to the events of December 24-25, 1914, the facts and myths regarding the event, and how, for a brief moment, World War I stood still.

Dr. Steve Bare is an adjunct faculty member in the University of Toledo’s History Department. Dr. Bare’s research and teaching specializations focus on how Americans craft historical memory of conflicts from the Civil War through WWII.

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