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In recognition of the fact that many nurses wish to obtain continuing education to meet their state’s licensure requirement or to gain exposure and knowledge in specialized areas of nursing for future employment, Lourdes College of Nursing offers several specialty courses. These courses are designed to provide discipline specific knowledge to the student (licensed or pre-licensure).  In the state of Ohio, academic credit for the successful completion of a course provided by an accredited educational institution, has a conversion formula of 1 credit hour in a semester system = 15 contact hours of CE.  Therefore, a nursing course offering associated with 3 credit hours provides 45 contact hours of C.E. and a 4-hour course provides 60 contact hours of C.E. Most courses offer an associated clinical course with them, though it is not mandatory.  All courses are pass/fail.  A pre-licensure student must have successfully completed at least two medical surgical courses and clinical rotations prior to enrolling for any of these specialty courses.  A post licensure student that has graduated from an accredited Nursing Program is considered adequately prepared to enroll in one of these specialty courses.

Peri-Operative Nursing I Theory
This initial perioperative course is designed to address the care of the patient in the operating room, foundational skills and principles, surgical modalities, positioning, instruments and patient/staff safety.  A focus is on the role of the circulating nurse and their functions in the surgical environment.  This is the first course in a series of three perioperative courses.  The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to perioperative nursing through a combination of classroom learning and optional clinical hours at a regional healthcare facility.  At the conclusion of this course students should have a basic understanding of the role of the perioperative nurse in surgery and other staff in the operating room.  The scope of peri-operative practice is so broad that diverse modalities such as group discussion, postings, journal clubs, case discussions, independent reading and other modalities may be used. Textbook- Alexander’s Car of the Patient in Surgery by J. Rothrock

Peri-Operative Nursing Clinical I (3.0 credit hours) (Offered only to students enrolled in the Perioperative Nursing I)
Nursing perioperative practicum is a precepted field experience in an acute operating room care setting for the nursing student enrolled in Introduction to Perioperative Nursing.  The student also attends a professional seminar designed to integrate clinical learning.  This clinical also will stress acquisition of the professional perioperative nurse identity and further development of perioperative skills and concepts.  Seminar will focus on collaboration, skill acquisition and problem-solving as students examine issues encountered in the perioperative care setting.

Introduction to Critical Care Nursing
This 4-credit hour course is designed to delve into the assessment, planning and management for safe and competent care of the patient in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)/Critical Care Unit (CCU).  The pivotal role of the professional critical care nurse is also covered.  This critical care course builds upon the student’s med-surg knowledge base, assimilating foundational knowledge and then moving into more complex critical care nursing concepts. Hemodynamics, pulmonary and ventilatory management, pain management, CNS pharmacology, pathologic conditions, cardiac rhythms, and advanced neurological concepts.  Texts utilized: AACN Essentials of Critical Care Nursing by S. Burns.

Critical Care Nursing Clinical I, (3.0 credit hours) (Offered only to students enrolled in the Introduction to Critical Care Nursing course)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the opportunity to build on the solid foundation of evidence based critical care interventions, incorporating knowledge and values learned in the “Introduction to Critical Care Nursing” course.  This will be accomplished by integrating and applying those concepts now as a developing skill set in the intensive care environment.  This course provides the student with hands on,  patient care, providing assessments, utilizing monitoring equipment and other technology.  The student will experience first-hand the role of the critical care (CC) nurse, as a clinician, team member and advocate. The focus will initially be on operationalizing foundational CC nursing knowledge, providing effective communication (verbally and in an electronic platform) and then moving into more complex critical nursing care delivery and execution of procedural techniques.  The number of clinical hours also allows students the opportunity to evaluate outcomes of care provided on an individual and system wide basis.

Introduction to Emergency Department Nursing
This 3 credit-hour course is designed to address care of the patient in the emergency department (ED), principles of resuscitation, triage and the prioritization and execution of priority patient care activities.  A focus is on the role of the emergency nurse; clinical interventions, need for exceptional teamwork and acquisition and application of a specialized body of clinical knowledge. Due to the nature of this vulnerable patient population and the need to report abuse and neglect, an emphasis on accountability, autonomy and collaboration with others will be incorporated. Effective communication, especially with the patient and family members will be discussed throughout the coursework and various cases. At the conclusion of this course, students should have a basic understanding of how to care for emergent patients, how to assist a patient’s family with coping, understand the role of a competent emergency nurse and that of the other staff in the Emergency Department. Texts include: Sheehy’s Emergency Nursing and The ENA Core Curriculum.

Emergent Care Nursing Clinical I (3.0 credit hours) (Offered only to students enrolled in the Introduction to Emergency Department Nursing)
This course builds on the knowledge, skills, and values presented in “Introduction to Emergency Department Nursing” integrating and applying those concepts and the skills learned and to provide emergency nursing care to patients hospitalized with evolving emergent conditions. The student will experience the role of the emergency department nurse, team member and advocate, as well as operationalizing foundational emergency nursing knowledge, providing effective communication and then moving into more complex emergent nursing care delivery and execution of procedural techniques with a clinical instructor. The number of clinical hours also allows students the opportunity to evaluate outcomes of care provided on an individual and system wide basis.

For questions, contact:

Douglas Mold
Title: Administrative Assistant to the Dean
Work: 419-824-3791
Email

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